Overnight Buckwheat Porridge

Overnight Buckwheat Porridge

Overnight buckwheat porridge.

You all know I LOVE breakfast. It’s my favorite and biggest meal of the day. I love starting off my day with something warm that’s chock full of healthy fats, protein, fiber and whole grains. My standard breakfast usually consists of steel cut oats or warm quinoa, but I decided I needed to add a bit more variety to my morning routine, so I gave buckwheat groats a try, and I’m so happy I did. This overnight buckwheat porridge is naturally gluten-free, dairy-free, and vegan to boot! It’s chock full of healthy fats, protein and will keep your blood sugar stable, and give you energy to go for hours. This breakfast keeps me full until lunch. 

What the heck is buckwheat?

Buckwheat – Buckwheat is not technically a grain, but the seed of a plant related to rhubarb. It’s a gluten-free, blood-building food that helps clean and strengthen the intestines and lower blood pressure. It has an earthy flavor and chewy texture. For this recipe, I am using raw buckwheat groats, not kasha, which is toasted buckwheat, as I want to make sure my groats are soaked to activate the nutrients, and make them more digestible. Store-bought kasha may not have been soaked prior to being toasted. 

The only downside to this recipe is that you’re going to have to plan ahead, as the raw buckwheat groats will need to be pre-soaked. This may seem like an extra step, and it is, but it just takes 2 extra minutes to pull together and will become part of your routine. See my notes in the below recipe to understand why you should pre-soak the buckwheat groats. 

Overnight buckwheat porridge.

Overnight Buckwheat Porridge

recipe adapted from Foolproof Living

For this recipe, I am using raw buckwheat groats, not kasha, which is toasted buckwheat, as I want to make sure my groats are soaked to activate the nutrients, and make them more digestible. Store-bought kasha may not have been soaked prior to being toasted. Update: I did try this recipe with Kasha, just to test it, and the kasha imparted this fake cinnamon taste (almost like cinnamon toast crunch) and threw off the flavors, so stick with the raw buckwheat groats. 

I chose not to add any sweetener to this recipe, so if you eat it as is, it’s bland. This is a base recipe, and I find that everyone has different levels of what is sweet to them, so you will need to add a bit of sweetener to your bowl to taste.

Full recipe – serves 4-6 

  • 1 cup raw organic buckwheat groats, not kasha – pre-soaked, rinsed – please see note below on how long, and why*  You can find buckwheat groats in most bulk bins at your grocery store. 
  • 1 can unsweetened canned coconut milk – I love Native Forest Simple, as it has no guar or gums and comes in BPA free cans – make sure to shake the can, and get the one where you can hear the milk swishing around, as it will be easier to work with. If you don’t want to use coconut milk, then increase the almond milk to 4 cups.
  • 2 1/2 cups almond milk, or alternative milk of choice – for store bought, I love Three Trees almond milk, as it’s as close to homemade as you can get. Ingredients are; filtered water, organic almonds, organic vanilla, plus they are a small female based SF company.
  • 1/4 cup chia seeds
  • 2 tablespoons hemp seeds
  • 2 teaspoons vanilla extract –I love this vanilla from Morton and Bassett, as it doesn’t have added sugar
  • 1 teaspoon ground cinnamon
  • 1/4 teaspoon pink Himalayan sea salt

Half recipe – serves 2-3

  • 1/2 cup raw organic buckwheat groats, not kasha – pre-soaked, rinsed – please see note below on how long, and why* you can find buckwheat groats in most bulk bins at your grocery store. 
  • 1 cup unsweetened canned coconut milk – I love Native Forest Simple, as it has no guar or gums and comes in BPA free cans – make sure to shake the can, and get the one where you can hear the milk swishing around, as it will be easier to work with. If you don’t want to use coconut milk, then increase the almond milk to 2 cups.
  • 1 cup almond milk, or alternative milk of choice – for store bought, I love Three Trees almond milk, as it’s as close to homemade as you can get. Ingredients are; filtered water, organic almonds, organic vanilla, plus they are a small female based SF company.
  • 2 tablespoons chia seeds
  • 1 tablespoon hemp seeds
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla extract –I love this vanilla from Morton and Bassett, as it doesn’t have added sugar
  • 1/2 teaspoon ground cinnamon
  • 1/8 teaspoon pink Himalayan sea salt

Suggested Toppings – This porridge is a base recipe, and you will need to add a bit of sweet to it

*Note: You will have to soak the buckwheat groats ahead of time, for at least 6 hours, and they can soak up to 20 hours. Soaking the groats enlivens the grain, activating nutrients, as well as making them more digestible.
 
Soaking groats: The day/morning (think 24 hours ahead) before you’re going to eat the porridge, put 1 cup buckwheat groats and 2-3 cups filtered water into a glass container fit with a lid. Let it soak on the counter all day (or place in the refrigerator, if it’s hot in your kitchen, think summer) until nighttime (this is when you will assemble the porridge together in the pan). This may all seem like a pain, and an extra step, but it takes 2 minutes, and you will get used to the routine, and it will become a habit. 
 
You will notice that the soaked buckwheat groats look a bit goopy and slimy, but that will go away after you rinse them. Pour soaked buckwheat groats into a fine mesh strainer and rinse under cold running water, tossing them around with your hands, until most of the sliminess is gone.
 
Get out a large pot, or dutch oven (I used my dutch oven) fit with a lid (smaller pot if making the half batch).  To the pot, add rinsed buckwheat groats, coconut milk, almond milk, chia seeds, hemp seeds, vanilla, cinnamon, and salt. Give mixture a good stir to combine, cover with lid, and let sit overnight in the fridge.
 
In the morning, the porridge will look pretty much the same as it did the night before. Below is a photo of it unstirred.
Overnight buckwheat porridge in the morning unstirred.
Give porridge a good stir and set the pot (uncovered) over medium-high heat, stirring occasionally, until the porridge bubbles and comes to a boil. You want to make sure to stir the porridge to prevent it from sticking to the bottom of the pan, and the chia from clumping. 
 
Lower the heat to medium-low, and cook, stirring occasionally, until porridge thickens, and is heated through. The whole process takes 10-15 minutes. As you can see in the below photos, it has thickened up quite a bit.
Overnight buckwheat porridge thickened.
Overnight buckwheat porridge thickened on stove.
Serve the porridge into individual bowls, add sweetener of choice, and top with the suggested toppings, or your toppings of choice. Enjoy!
 
I love my porridge topped with Sam’s Adventure classic almond butter and my blackberry chia compote and a drizzle of maple syrup, or Manuka honey.
Overnight buckwheat porridge.
Steve loves this porridge too! He’s currently training for the Leadville 100 mountain bike race, so he’s on a glucose monitor to help with his training and nutrition, and his blood sugar levels stay flat with this breakfast, as well as it gives him energy to bike 3-4 hours. He’s asked me to make this breakfast the morning of is big race. Below is his porridge topped with walnuts, pomegranate seeds and a drizzle of maple syrup, and of course mine with the usual. 
His and her buckwheat porridge in bowls.
Store the leftovers in a sealed container in the fridge.  Leftovers will last 2-3 days.
 
Reheating leftovers:  The porridge will thicken up to a big clump due to the chia, it isn’t pretty, but don’t fret, as all you need to do is add a bit of almond milk or water to the mixture and it will get back to it’s porridge-like consistency.  To re-heat the leftovers, put desired amount of porridge into a sauce pan along with some almond milk, or water (to thin it out) and set it over medium-low heat, stirring occasionally until heated through.
 
Below is a picture of my porridge with Soco Tahini, a combination of raspberry, blackberry chia compotedrizzle of maple syrup and a sprinkle of bee pollen.
Overnight buckwheat porridge with tahini, blackberry chia compote and bee pollen.
If you make this, let me know what you think and what you end up topping yours with. Send me some photos on instagram and I’ll share them in the post!
 
With love Jackie

Overnight Buckwheat Porridge

5 from 2 votes
Recipe by Jackie
Servings

4-6

servings

Note: This recipes requires you to think in advance the morning before, as you will have to soak the buckwheat groats during the day. See my notes in below recipe. The recipe below serves 4-6, see above post for the halved version of the recipe, which serves 2-3.

Ingredients

  • 1 cup raw organic buckwheat groats, not kasha – pre-soaked, rinsed – please see note below on how long, and why* You can find buckwheat groats in most bulk bins at your grocery store. 

  • 1 can unsweetened canned coconut milk –  I love Native Forest Simple, as it has no guar or gums and comes in BPA free cans – make sure to shake the can, and get the one where you can hear the milk swishing around, as it will be easier to work with. If you don't want to use coconut milk, then increase the almond milk to 4 cups.

  • 2 1/2 cups almond milk, or alternative milk of choice – for store bought, I love Three Trees almond milk, as it’s as close to homemade as you can get. Ingredients are; filtered water, organic almonds, organic vanilla, plus they are a small female based SF company.

  • 1/4 cup chia seeds

  • 2 tablespoons hemp seeds

  • 2 teaspoons vanilla extract –I love this vanilla from Morton and Bassett, as it doesn’t have added sugar

  • 1 teaspoon ground cinnamon

  • 1/4 teaspoon pink Himalayan sea salt

  • Suggested Toppings -This porridge is a base recipe, and you will need to add a bit of sweet to it
  • Pure maple syrup, or honey – I love Manuka honey

  • Fresh fruit such as; strawberries, blueberries, smashed raspberries, pomegranate seeds, blackberries or sautéed cinnamon apples

  • Blackberry chia compote – no added sugar I do this in the fall and winter months where there isn’t fresh fruit, as it uses frozen berries

  • Spoonful of almond butter, walnut butter or peanut-butterI am obsessed with this almond butter from Sam’s Adventure Snacks. It’s locally made in SF and has the perfect consistency and the sea salt really amplifies the flavor. 

  • I love this tahini with dates from SoCo, use code THANKS for 20% of

  • Sprinkle of bee pollen

Directions

  • *Note: You will have to soak the buckwheat groats ahead of time, for at least 6 hours, and they can soak up to 20 hours. Soaking the groats enlivens the grain, activating nutrients, as well as making them more digestible.

    Soaking groats: The day/morning (think 24 hours ahead) before you’re going to eat the porridge, put 1 cup buckwheat groats and 2 cups filtered water into a glass container fit with a lid. Let it soak on the counter all day (or place in the refrigerator, if it’s hot in your kitchen, think summer) until nighttime (this is when you will assemble the porridge together in the pan). This may all seem like a pain, and an extra step, but it takes 2 minutes, and you will get used to the routine, and it will become a habit. 

  • You will notice that the soaked buckwheat groats look a bit goopy and slimy, but that will go away after you rinse them. Pour soaked buckwheat groats into a fine mesh strainer and rinse under cold running water, tossing them around with your hands, until most of the sliminess is gone.
     
  • Get out a large pot, or dutch oven (I used my dutch oven) fit with a lid (smaller pot if making the half batch).  To the pot, add rinsed buckwheat groats, coconut milk, almond milk, chia seeds, hemp seeds, vanilla, cinnamon, and salt. Give mixture a good stir to combine, cover with lid, and let sit overnight in the fridge.

  • In the morning, the porridge will look pretty much the same as it did the night before. Give porridge a good stir and set the pot (uncovered) over medium-high heat, stirring occasionally, until the porridge bubbles and comes to a boil. You want to make sure to stir the porridge to prevent it from sticking to the bottom of the pan, and the chia from clumping.

    Lower the heat to medium-low, and cook, stirring occasionally, until porridge thickens, and is heated through. The whole process takes 10-15 minutes.

  • Serve the porridge into individual bowls, add sweetener of choice, and top with the suggested toppings, or your toppings of choice. Enjoy!

  • Store the leftovers in a sealed container in the fridge.  Leftovers will last 2-3 days.
     
    Reheating leftovers:  The porridge will thicken up to a big clump due to the chia, it isn’t pretty, but don’t fret, as all you need to do is add a bit of almond milk, or water to the mixture and it will get back to it’s porridge-like consistency. To re-heat the leftovers, put desired amount of porridge into a sauce pan along with some almond milk, or water (to thin it out) and set it over medium-low heat, stirring occasionally until heated through.

Notes:

  • For this recipe, I am using raw buckwheat groats, not kasha, which is toasted buckwheat, as I want to make sure my groats are soaked to activate the nutrients, and make them more digestible. Store-bought kasha may not have been soaked prior to being toasted. Update: I did try this recipe with Kasha, just to test it, and the kasha imparted this fake cinnamon taste (almost like cinnamon toast crunch) and threw off the flavors, so stick with the raw buckwheat groats. 
  • Feel free to replace the coconut milk with almond milk or milk of choice (see my notes in the recipe) if you don't want the extra fat. Coconut milk is a healthy fat that is great for our brains, but I get it. It also lends a natural sweetness to the buckwheat porridge.
  • Steve loves this porridge too! He's currently training for the Leadville 100 mountain bike race, so he's on a glucose monitor to help with his training and nutrition, and his blood sugar levels stay flat with this breakfast, as well as it gives him energy to bike 3-4 hours. It also gives me energy to run in the woods with gusto!
  • I chose not to add any sweetener to this recipe, so if you eat it as is, it's bland. This is a base recipe, and I find that everyone has different levels of what is sweet to them, so you will need to add a bit of sweetener to your bowl to taste.

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